Withholding Judgment

A person who withholds judgment brainstorms without evaluating or analyzing each idea as it emerges. The creative among us are willing to explore ideas before they decide whether their ideas are correct or incorrect, good or bad, applicable or inapplicable. This characteristic enables innovative people to more readily “think outside the box” before dismissing any ideas. When we delay our judgments while brainstorming, we are likely to think of more high quality ideas. When we judge, we are looking for what does not work or fit, rather than the possibility of what might work or fit.

A person who withholds judgment brainstorms without evaluating or analyzing each idea as it emerges. The creative among us are willing to explore multiple ideas before they decide whether their ideas are correct or incorrect, good or bad, applicable or inapplicable. This characteristic enables innovative people to more readily “thinking outside the box” as the expression goes before dismissing any ideas.

When we delay our judgments while brainstorming, we are likely to think of more high quality ideas. When we judge, we are looking at what does not work or fit, rather than the possibility of what might work or fit.

Of course, if you always thought of your best ideas right away, you would not need to withhold judgment. However, people rarely produce their best ideas immediately because they refine their knowledge of the problem as they search for answers. If you accept the first solution that pops into your mind, it often will be a mediocre solution. Persistence produces better solutions.

While in the early stages of problem solving, the creative person considers any and all ideas, but as the problem gets closer to solution, the individual is willing to judge and even go back and change initial ideas or approaches. This is where critical mindedness comes into play. Once ideas are expressed, creative people are ruthless in reworking their product until it meets high standards. This attribute can be enhanced with practice.